Agriculture

Published on Wed, 05/20/2015 by BASF Canada

Protect your canola from sclerotinia

Protect your canola from sclerotinia

A wet spring with moderate temperatures could create the conditions necessary for sclerotinia on your farm. If you don’t spray for sclerotinia or you don’t spray at the right time, your canola field could lose greater than half of its yield. If you wait until the first signs of the disease appear, it will be too late.

“The key to optimum sclerotinia control is timing,” said Glen Forster, Technical Marketing Specialist with BASF Canada.

Published on Tue, 05/12/2015 by BASF Canada

Economics favour a two-pass system

Economics favour a two-pass system

Planning ahead for top quality wheat with a two-pass fungicide application can help maximize grain quality and yields, and provide an additional straw yield increase.

Although many independent agronomists recommend a two-pass fungicide application, the practice is not standard for all wheat growers. Most farmers will apply a fungicide at the heading stage, but an earlier application at the flag leaf stage is not always warranted.

Published on Mon, 05/04/2015 by BASF Canada

Get crops off to the best start with a pre-seed burndown

Get crops off to the best start with a pre-seed burndown

Canadian growers know that one of the toughest things to deal with in agriculture is one of the things they have absolutely no control over - the weather. A long winter followed by cool spring temperatures is one of the season’s first challenges and often the biggest since it can delay seeding by several weeks.

Even with seeding delays, one thing you don’t want to skip in the spring is a burndown. Starting the season with clean fields will help crops get off to the best start and will help keep fields clean until a properly timed in-crop herbicide application.

Published on Fri, 05/01/2015 by Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA)

L’Association canadienne de sécurité agricole continue de ‘Faire la différence’.

L’Association canadienne de sécurité agricole continue de ‘Faire la différence’.

Formation en ligne sur la sécurité agricole offerte maintenant

Winnipeg MB, le 1 mai 2015 – L’Association canadienne de sécurité agricole (ACSA) a le plaisir d’offrir gratuitement trois cours de formation en ligne sur la sécurité agricole jusqu’au 31 mai 2015,  gracieuseté de Financement agricole Canada (FAC) et de l’Institut canadien des engrais (ICE).

Published on Fri, 05/01/2015 by Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA)

The Canadian Agricultural Safety Association Continues to “Be the Difference.”

The Canadian Agricultural Safety Association Continues to “Be the Difference.”

On-line Farm Safety Training Now Available  

Winnipeg, MB, May 1, 2015 – The Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA) is pleased to offer three online farm safety training courses free of charge until May 31, 2015 courtesy of Farm Credit Canada (FCC) and the Canadian Fertilizer Institute (CFI).

Published on Tue, 04/28/2015 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Bees, moths and butterflies oh my! Create a pollinator oasis right at home

Bees, moths and butterflies oh my! Create a pollinator oasis right at home

Did you know that about one-third of the world’s food crop production relies on pollination? Perhaps due to this connection, the plight of pollinators (bees in particular) has recently become highly publicized worldwide. Todd Farrell, conservation biologist with the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) says that while bees have been the poster child in the media, other pollinators such as butterflies and moths that are facing similar challenges should not be left out.

Published on Mon, 04/27/2015 by BASF Canada

The future of lentils is bright

The future of lentils is bright

Canada has seen tremendous growth in lentil production as lentil consumption has soared over the last few years. According to Bert Vandenberg, University of Saskatchewan Plant Sciences Department, Crop Development Centre, world lentil consumption has gone up four to five times relative to the human population. Lentil production in Saskatchewan alone has gone from 25,000 acres in 1983 to more than three million acres today. With growth like this, it is no wonder the future looks so promising.

Published on Wed, 04/22/2015 by BASF Canada

BASF is commited to new solutions that lead to a brighter future

BASF is commited to new solutions that lead to a brighter future

BASF has an impressive portfolio of products that satisfies growers’ needs throughout the growing season. To remain a leader in the industry, BASF is investing in research to produce the best chemistries that will combat resistance issues that growers face today. BASF introduced Odyssey Ultra for the 2015 growing season, which combines the early season broadleaf and flushing weed control of Odyssey with the proven grass control of Poast Ultra.

Published on Wed, 04/22/2015 by BASF Canada

Optill est une excellente option pour le travail vertical ou travail minimum du sol

Optill est une excellente option pour le travail vertical ou travail minimum du sol

La vergerette du Canada s’avère être de plus en plus préoccupante pour les producteurs de l’Ouest de la province, surtout dans la culture   du soya pour laquelle les options de contrôle  sont limitées. Selon Peter Sikkema,  professeur en gestion des mauvaises herbes dans les cultures au campus de Ridgetown de l’Université de Guelph, la présence de mauvaises herbes résistantes au glyphosate augmente chaque année.

Published on Mon, 04/20/2015 by BASF Canada

Optill is a good option for vertical tillage

Optill is a good option for vertical tillage

Canada fleabane is a major concern for growers, especially in soybeans since post emergent control options are limited. According to Peter Sikkema, a professor of field crop weed management at the University of Guelph’s Ridgetown campus, the presence of glyphosate-resistant weeds is increasing every year. Since Canada fleabane has wind-dispersed seeds which can produce upwards of 200,000 seeds per plant, it is no wonder resistant biotypes are have spread so quickly across Ontario.

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