Health and Safety

Published on Wed, 12/17/2008 by Canada Health Infoway

ATTN: NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Digital technology saving lives in Newfoundland and Labrador

ATTN: NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Digital technology saving lives in Newfoundland and Labrador

Thanks to digital diagnostic imaging, a 10-year-old boy from the Island of Newfoundland is alive today.

The youngster needed brain surgery but was too sick to be transported to a major surgical centre to get treatment. Using real-time support through diagnostic imagery, neurosurgical and radiology experts in St. John's were able to support and direct a general surgeon hundreds of miles away in Goose Bay who performed the delicate procedure. The surgery was crucial in saving the boy's life after he suffered extensive head trauma in an ATV accident.

Published on Wed, 12/17/2008 by Canada Health Infoway

ATTN: ALBERTA NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Digital technology saving lives in Alberta

ATTN: ALBERTA NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Digital technology saving lives in Alberta

Alberta's digital diagnostic imaging and electronic health record network is helping to save lives across the province. That's because patients can get same-day results from key medical tests, and faster access to treatment.

Digitized diagnostic images, including x-rays, ultrasounds, MRI and CT scans, allow clinicians to view patient images no matter where the test was conducted or the location of the clinician. The sharing and remote access to images is enabled by Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS).

Published on Wed, 12/17/2008 by Canada Health Infoway

ATTN: BRITISH COLUMBIA NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Technology improving patient care in B.C.

ATTN: BRITISH COLUMBIA NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Technology improving patient care in B.C.

Doctors were able to stop the internal bleeding of a 42-year-old man, seriously injured in a car crash in British Columbia, by using a safer, simpler technique rather than potentially more difficult and risky exploratory surgery. The technique involved the use of digitized diagnostic imaging, according to a top imaging expert in the province.

Published on Wed, 12/17/2008 by Canada Health Infoway

ATTN: SASKATCHEWAN NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Digital technology improving patient care in Saskatchewan

ATTN: SASKATCHEWAN NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Digital technology improving patient care in Saskatchewan

At one acute-care Saskatchewan hospital, Canada's investments in digital diagnostic imaging has meant the creation of a new on-site MRI centre that’s reducing wait times for this vital service by more than a month.

Corey Miller, director of medical imaging and nuclear medicine services for the Saskatoon Health Region, says by switching to the Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS), the hospital was able to eliminate film libraries, creating enough space to accommodate a new MRI service.

Published on Wed, 12/17/2008 by Canada Health Infoway

ATTN: ONTARIO NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Better patient care in Ontario with digital diagnostic imaging

ATTN: ONTARIO NEWS/HEALTH EDITORS - Better patient care in Ontario with digital diagnostic imaging

Thousands of Ontarians are getting faster access to quality health care thanks to Canada’s investments in digital diagnostic imaging.

Dr. Donald Taves, chief of radiology at St. Joseph’s Health Care in London, Ontario, says advances in digital diagnostic imaging means x-rays, ultrasounds, and CT and MRI scans can now be available to authorized health care professionals and patients faster and better than ever before. Clinicians can have access to the images no matter where the test was conducted or where the health care provider is located.

Published on Wed, 12/10/2008 by Public Health Agency of Canada

A Reminder to Roll Up Your Sleeves

A Reminder to Roll Up Your Sleeves

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Dr. David Butler-Jones, M.D.
Chief Public Health Officer of Canada

This year up to a quarter of Canadians will catch the flu, also known as influenza, so now is a good time to think about some simple things you can do to protect yourself and others, including rolling up your sleeves for your annual flu shot.

Published on Tue, 12/02/2008 by Cystic Fibrosis Canada

Carleton University students continue to shine!

Carleton University students continue to shine!

Toronto, ON (December 2, 2008) – The Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CCFF) applauds the decision of the Carleton University Students' Association (CUSA) on Monday night to continue its long-standing partnership with Shinerama.

Last week, the Association voted to cancel the annual fundraiser at Carleton University. After many students expressed their concern over the vote, a second motion to re-instate Shinerama was put forth. At yesterday's meeting, the new motion was passed, setting the stage for another Shinerama campaign in 2009 at the university.

Published on Wed, 11/19/2008 by The War Amps

WAR AMPS CONGRATULATES CFL'S BURRIS AS 2008 NICKLIN WINNER

WAR AMPS CONGRATULATES CFL'S BURRIS AS 2008 NICKLIN WINNER

OTTAWA, November 18, 2008 -- With the 2008 Grey Cup approaching, The War Amps has written Calgary Stampeders quarterback Henry Burris to congratulate him for his selection as the 2008 winner of the Jeff Nicklin Memorial Trophy, presented by the Canadian Football League to the most outstanding player in the Western Conference.

Published on Wed, 11/19/2008 by No Company Title

Holiday Check List helps keep mom and dad safe at home

Holiday Check List helps keep mom and dad safe at home

Lynne Malandrino still vividly remembers the panic she felt when she received the call asking for "the daughter of Ruth Joyce." Lynne immediately imagined the worst.

Lynne's mother had fallen down the back steps of her home. Alone and immobilized by a broken leg, she could do nothing except shout for help. Luckily, a painter working nearby heard her and called an ambulance. A neighbour found Lynne's number, but in the turmoil of the moment, could not remember Lynne's name.

Published on Fri, 11/14/2008 by Public Health Agency of Canada

Protecting your family from diabetes – know the risks

Protecting your family from diabetes – know the risks

Dr. David Butler-Jones, Chief Public Health Officer, Public Health Agency of Canada

Diabetes is one of the fastest growing diseases in Canada and one of the biggest threats facing the health of our population. The effects of the disease are serious, as it is the leading cause of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and leg amputations. Thankfully, the most common type of diabetes (type 2) is largely preventable once you are aware of the risk factors.

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