Health and Safety

Published on Thu, 01/28/2010 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

FACT SHEET #3: Be safe! Don’t pay the price!

FACT SHEET #3: Be safe! Don’t pay the price!

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Canadian Agricultural Safety Week, March 14 – 20, 2010

Insurance may offer you $10,000 for a leg, $6,000 for an arm, but fingers only net about $900. What dollar value would assign to your body? How about your life? And what would the real costs of injury or death mean to you, your family and your business?

Published on Thu, 01/28/2010 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

FACT SHEET #2: Let safety be a factor in hiring

FACT SHEET #2: Let safety be a factor in hiring

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Canadian Agricultural Safety Week, March 14 – 20, 2010

An important part of effective farm management is hiring and keeping quality farm labour, often in competition with non-farm employers for skilled workers. There are a number of things that should be considered in the hiring process to help ensure that you hire the right person.

Published on Thu, 01/28/2010 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

FACT SHEET #1: PEI a model for Farm Safety Code of Practice

FACT SHEET #1: PEI a model for Farm Safety Code of Practice

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Canadian Agricultural Safety Week, March 14 – 20, 2010

In February 2006, Prince Edward Island released its Farm Safety Code of Practice – a first for Canada and a model for the other provinces. The need for a Farm Safety Code of Practice stems from agriculture’s continued ranking as one of the most dangerous occupations in Canada.

Published on Wed, 01/20/2010 by Public Health Agency of Canada

Going for Healthy Living Gold – Get Inspired by the 2010 Winter Games

Going for Healthy Living Gold – Get Inspired by the 2010 Winter Games

By Dr. David Butler-Jones MD, Chief Public Health Officer of Canada

With the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Vancouver just a matter of weeks away, many of us are already planning our television-viewing schedules to ensure we don’t miss any of our favourite events or athletes. Yet, while our athletes are striving to reach gold, the majority of Canadians are not active enough for good health. With obesity rates at an all-time high, the importance of daily physical activity and healthy eating cannot be stressed enough.

Published on Thu, 12/24/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Media Advisory from the Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Media Advisory from the Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Dear Editors and Publishers,

“Personal protective equipment (PPE) only works if you use it!” is the theme of this year’s Canadian Agricultural Safety campaign with a focus on the use, fit and access of personal protective equipment in agriculture. The year-long campaign was launched with Canadian Agricultural Safety Week last March.

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Give the gift of safety

Give the gift of safety

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

It’s that time of year again when you fuss and ponder over what to get the farmers on your Christmas list. Stress no more. Give the gift of safety!

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Take a safety snooze!

Take a safety snooze!

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

The most frequent causes of farm-related injuries include the unsafe use of machinery or material-handling practices, followed by fatigue, trying to save time and miscommunication between workers, says the Census of Agriculture 2001. And common sense tells us: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Farmers urged to protect against organic dust

Farmers urged to protect against organic dust

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

Organic dust is a silent hazard on farms. It’s easy to ignore – but can cause serious short and long term health problems.

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Grain bin safety: The killer harvest

Grain bin safety: The killer harvest

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

The golden grain rushing through an auger to or from a grain bin should represent the rewards of a hard-earned harvest that brought satisfaction and prosperity. Unfortunately, all too often that golden harvest kills farmers.

Grain bins are commonly used to store grains such as corn, soybeans, wheat, oats, and sorghum. And every year several Canadian farmers suffocate in those same bins. Those deaths are preventable.

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

ATVs: fun that can kill

ATVs: fun that can kill

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

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