Health and Safety

Published on Thu, 12/24/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Media Advisory from the Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Media Advisory from the Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Dear Editors and Publishers,

“Personal protective equipment (PPE) only works if you use it!” is the theme of this year’s Canadian Agricultural Safety campaign with a focus on the use, fit and access of personal protective equipment in agriculture. The year-long campaign was launched with Canadian Agricultural Safety Week last March.

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Give the gift of safety

Give the gift of safety

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

It’s that time of year again when you fuss and ponder over what to get the farmers on your Christmas list. Stress no more. Give the gift of safety!

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Take a safety snooze!

Take a safety snooze!

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

The most frequent causes of farm-related injuries include the unsafe use of machinery or material-handling practices, followed by fatigue, trying to save time and miscommunication between workers, says the Census of Agriculture 2001. And common sense tells us: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Farmers urged to protect against organic dust

Farmers urged to protect against organic dust

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

Organic dust is a silent hazard on farms. It’s easy to ignore – but can cause serious short and long term health problems.

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Grain bin safety: The killer harvest

Grain bin safety: The killer harvest

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

The golden grain rushing through an auger to or from a grain bin should represent the rewards of a hard-earned harvest that brought satisfaction and prosperity. Unfortunately, all too often that golden harvest kills farmers.

Grain bins are commonly used to store grains such as corn, soybeans, wheat, oats, and sorghum. And every year several Canadian farmers suffocate in those same bins. Those deaths are preventable.

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

ATVs: fun that can kill

ATVs: fun that can kill

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Emergency Preparedness: Dial 911 and then what?

Emergency Preparedness: Dial 911 and then what?

RiskChartEngWeb.jpg

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

Fire, injury, flood, power failure, chemical spill, building collapse, extreme weather – the possible causes of an emergency are endless. Are you prepared? After you dial 911, then what happens?

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

Be prepared for a spill before you handle pesticides

Be prepared for a spill before you handle pesticides

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

Pesticide spills can harm your health, crops, community, and environment. They can also be difficult and costly to clean up. Here is some advice on spill prevention and how to create a spill kit for your farm.

Published on Wed, 12/23/2009 by Canadian Federation of Agriculture

PPE only works if you use it!

PPE only works if you use it!

by Theresa Whalen
CFA Farm Safety Consultant

“PPE only works if you use it!” is this year’s Canadian agricultural safety campaign theme with a focus on the use, fit and access of personal protective equipment (PPE) in agriculture. The yearlong campaign was launched last March with Canadian Agricultural Safety Week.

PPE includes eye and face protection, hearing protection, protective clothing, protective creams and lotions, and respiratory protective devices.

Published on Fri, 12/18/2009 by Canadian Cancer Society

Ontario woman reveals how her computer helped her quit smoking

Ontario woman reveals how her computer helped her quit smoking

Alliston resident Kathy Klemarow has not had a cigarette since March 4, 2008. After smoking for more than 30 years, she attributes a great deal of her smoke-free success to the support she found online.

Her Quit Meter tells her that she has saved $6,540 and has gained 68 days of life since quitting smoking. Klemarow monitors her Quit Meter on Smokers’ Helpline Online (SHO), a program by the Canadian Cancer Society. On the web at www.SmokersHelpline.ca, it offers support, advice and information to Ontarians about quitting smoking and tobacco use.

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