Food and Nutrition

Published on Wed, 05/20/2015 by BASF Canada

Protect your canola from sclerotinia

Protect your canola from sclerotinia

A wet spring with moderate temperatures could create the conditions necessary for sclerotinia on your farm. If you don’t spray for sclerotinia or you don’t spray at the right time, your canola field could lose greater than half of its yield. If you wait until the first signs of the disease appear, it will be too late.

“The key to optimum sclerotinia control is timing,” said Glen Forster, Technical Marketing Specialist with BASF Canada.

Published on Mon, 05/04/2015 by BASF Canada

Get crops off to the best start with a pre-seed burndown

Get crops off to the best start with a pre-seed burndown

Canadian growers know that one of the toughest things to deal with in agriculture is one of the things they have absolutely no control over - the weather. A long winter followed by cool spring temperatures is one of the season’s first challenges and often the biggest since it can delay seeding by several weeks.

Even with seeding delays, one thing you don’t want to skip in the spring is a burndown. Starting the season with clean fields will help crops get off to the best start and will help keep fields clean until a properly timed in-crop herbicide application.

Published on Tue, 04/28/2015 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Bees, moths and butterflies oh my! Create a pollinator oasis right at home

Bees, moths and butterflies oh my! Create a pollinator oasis right at home

Did you know that about one-third of the world’s food crop production relies on pollination? Perhaps due to this connection, the plight of pollinators (bees in particular) has recently become highly publicized worldwide. Todd Farrell, conservation biologist with the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) says that while bees have been the poster child in the media, other pollinators such as butterflies and moths that are facing similar challenges should not be left out.

Published on Mon, 04/27/2015 by BASF Canada

The future of lentils is bright

The future of lentils is bright

Canada has seen tremendous growth in lentil production as lentil consumption has soared over the last few years. According to Bert Vandenberg, University of Saskatchewan Plant Sciences Department, Crop Development Centre, world lentil consumption has gone up four to five times relative to the human population. Lentil production in Saskatchewan alone has gone from 25,000 acres in 1983 to more than three million acres today. With growth like this, it is no wonder the future looks so promising.

Published on Mon, 04/20/2015 by BASF Canada

Optill is a good option for vertical tillage

Optill is a good option for vertical tillage

Canada fleabane is a major concern for growers, especially in soybeans since post emergent control options are limited. According to Peter Sikkema, a professor of field crop weed management at the University of Guelph’s Ridgetown campus, the presence of glyphosate-resistant weeds is increasing every year. Since Canada fleabane has wind-dispersed seeds which can produce upwards of 200,000 seeds per plant, it is no wonder resistant biotypes are have spread so quickly across Ontario.

Published on Tue, 04/14/2015 by BASF Canada

Increase expected for Canadian wheat acres in 2015

Increase expected for Canadian wheat acres in 2015

According to Statistics Canada, 2014 national wheat production (excluding durum) decreased by 22.26 percent when compared to 2013. Harvested area decreased by 10.28 percent and average yield decreased by 13.35 percent. The results of 2014 came from a combination of aspects such as the late harvest and excessive moisture affecting the amount of acres seeded in eastern Saskatchewan and Manitoba. 

Published on Wed, 04/08/2015 by BASF Canada

Get crops off to the best start with a pre-seed burndown

Get crops off to the best start with a pre-seed burndown

A spring burndown is a critical step in preparing the soil for seeding; however, it can often be overlooked if growers are rushing to get ahead of the growing season. Seeding crops into clean fields means they don’t have to compete for moisture, sunlight or nutrients from weeds. Seeding crops into clean fields will help get them off to the best possible start but there are a number of things to keep in mind that will increase the effectiveness of any burndown.

Published on Tue, 02/03/2015 by BASF Canada

The evolution of Canada’s most profitable crop

The evolution of Canada’s most profitable crop

From its inception in the 1970s to today, canola has steadily evolved and become the most profitable crop in Canada.

In the 1990s, canola moved from open pollinated cultivars to high yielding hybrids. In 1995, the first herbicide-tolerant variety was released followed by the introduction of disease-resistant varieties.

As canola production continues to evolve, growers look for innovative tools and technologies to help meet challenges and maximize canola production.

Published on Thu, 01/29/2015 by Nature Conservancy of Canada - English

Wetlands – havens for human and wildlife

Wetlands – havens for human and wildlife

World Wetlands Day, celebrated every February 2nd, encourages citizens around the world to turn their thoughts to wetlands and their importance in our lives. Wetlands provide a reliable food supply and help purify freshwater for billions of global citizens. Like giant sponges, they absorb and replenish water to buffer flood and drought risks. Wetlands are also vital nesting, breeding and staging grounds for waterfowl and many other species and continue to be among the most diverse ecosystems of all. And that’s barely skimming the surface of wetlands’ wonders.

Published on Wed, 08/06/2014 by BASF Canada

Growers with unseeded acres need to consider weed control options

Growers with unseeded acres need to consider weed control options

Growers across the West have been faced with a number challenges this season that have left many acres unseeded. Cold, wet conditions this spring followed by devastating summer hail storms and flooding have taken millions of acres out of production.

Using multiple modes of action when controlling weeds on chemfallow fields will be extremely important as affected growers try to put this season behind them and prepare for next year.

Affected growers will need to think about how to best manage those acres since weed control will be a key concern as preparations for next year begin. Weed management strategies such as chemfallow, pre-harvest and post-harvest applications should be considered as a part of weed management practice.

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