Environment and Nature

Published on Mon, 11/24/2014 by Nature Conservancy of Canada - English

More Canadians choose charitable giving this season

More Canadians choose charitable giving this season

As the giving season approaches, there is good indication that philanthropy is on the rise amongst Canadians.  A recently released BMO Charitable Giving Poll found that more Canadians (84 percent) are giving, and they’re giving more ($624 on average per year) — both up seven percent from last year.

Published on Mon, 11/17/2014 by Nature Conservancy of Canada - English

Get out and enjoy Canada’s winter wonderland

Get out and enjoy Canada’s winter wonderland

“Every so often nature surprises you with sightings of bird species that seem to have missed the memo about migration”

For many Canadians, scarves, mitts, boots and gloves have become fashion must-haves as the last leaves of autumn were followed by the first snow over the past week. For many of us, the thought of dealing with slush and ice on top of fighting a cold sounds pretty depressing. But before begging for summer’s return, there are ways that can ease your wintertime blues. Here are three activities to help you and your family discover the wonder in this land of ice and snow this season.

Spot and hear the birds

Published on Wed, 10/29/2014 by Nature Conservancy of Canada - English

Have a fearless Halloween this year by shedding light on nature’s spooky species

Have a fearless Halloween this year by shedding light on nature’s spooky species

With Halloween in our midst, it’s hard to miss the décor, costumes and embellishments that use spiders to evoke a spooky aesthetic.  But does the spider truly deserve this creepy reputation? You may have caught wind of a viral YouTube prank that captures a pint-sized dog wearing a realistic spider costume as it chases spooked prankees away.  Many cited the mutant-like spider-dog as “cute” and he quickly become an internet sensation.

Published on Thu, 09/11/2014 by BASF Canada

Post-harvest scouting in canola

Post-harvest scouting in canola

Over the last few years, various public disease surveys show an increase in the incidence and severity of the canola disease blackleg across Western Canada. According to the Canola Council of Canada, blackleg was the most damaging canola disease throughout the 1980s and early 1990s and if it is not managed carefully, blackleg can cause significant yield losses.

Published on Wed, 07/30/2014 by BASF Canada

Protecting corn against northern leaf blight

Protecting corn against northern leaf blight

Northern corn leaf blight, a common yield-robbing fungal leaf disease south of the border, is becoming more common in corn fields throughout Ontario. As the disease develops, it blocks the flow of nutrients from the leaves throughout the crop, ultimately affecting grain quality and yields.

With the wet spring in Ontario this year, crop staging is variable throughout the province. In some areas, growers were able to get their crop in on time, but many acres were planted late.

The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) and Agriculture and Agri Food Canada, with funding from the Ontario Seed Corn Growers and the Grain Farmers of Ontario through Growing Forward, have been following different corn diseases for the past 15 years.

Published on Thu, 07/24/2014 by BASF Canada

Demand for food-grade level soybeans increasing

Demand for food-grade level soybeans increasing

Soybean growers must ensure they grow, scout, and manage their crops according to the detailed requirements of buying companies.

The 2014 season has seen record high soybean acres planted across Canada, including a significant increase in non-GMO soybeans in Eastern Canada. With Eastern Canadian growers expanding their share of soybeans into the food-grade market, growers will need to deliver high-quality soybeans at the international level. 

Published on Thu, 06/26/2014 by Ontario Association of Naturopathic Doctors

Every day is Allergy Day

Every day is Allergy Day

Most allergies begin – and can be treated – in the gut

“A weekend of healthy eating won’t cure heart disease. The same holds true for allergies.  Treat every day as allergy day.”

By Alfred Hauk, naturopathic doctor

Between March and the first frost, Ontario has three seasons replete with outdoor environmental allergens, as well as year-round indoor environmental allergens, such as mites, dust and pet dander.

Published on Fri, 06/20/2014 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Make your summer matter

Make your summer matter

In the past decade, NCC staff members have mentored more than 350 students through their science and stewardship programs. 

With summer underway, students are looking for ways to occupy the summer months: camping trips, water sports and days spent on the sand. Some are even getting a head start on their post-secondary success, by spending their summer learning through conservation work. This kind of extra-curricular education can be found from coast to coast, in many different capacities. From administrative help to fundraising, many not-for-profit organizations offer their expertise to ambitious students looking to learn.

Published on Tue, 06/17/2014 by Mosquito-Less

Mosquitoes Hate Garlic Oil

Mosquitoes Hate Garlic Oil

Summer is here across Canada and swarming mosquitoes are on us now. 

Mosquitoes, who can be 1000's of times more sensitive to garlic than humans, know it is present and prefer to stay clear of the treated area.

Home owners, cottagers, wedding parties and other outdoor event groups can have their day or evening ruined by these pests. There are also obvious associated health issues with mosquitoes almost nationwide now.

Published on Thu, 05/01/2014 by Nature Conservancy of Canada - English

Celebrate your mother with Mother Nature

Celebrate your mother with Mother Nature

What could be more unique than one-on-one time together outside caring for Mother Nature herself?

Finding the perfect Mother’s Day gift is rarely a simple task. You want to be sure what you’re giving her is something truly special and unique. So, what could be more unique than one-on-one time together outside caring for Mother Nature herself?

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