Environment and Nature

Published on Mon, 06/25/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Look out for and report Giant hogweed: Nature Conservancy of Canada raises awareness about dangerous plant

Look out for and report Giant hogweed: Nature Conservancy of Canada raises awareness about dangerous plant

While summer is arriving, another sign of better weather brings a troublesome and dangerous plant called giant hogweed.

Giant hogweed is one of Canada’s most dangerous plants as it poses a real human health concern.

The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is urging people across the country to document sightings of the towering green plant. Giant hogweed is one of Canada’s most dangerous plants as it poses a real human health concern.

Published on Thu, 06/21/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Nature Conservancy of Canada offers national challenge for Canadians

Nature Conservancy of Canada offers national challenge for Canadians

As summer approaches and people look for things to do over the coming weeks, the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is offering fun ideas that help out nature.

Our individual actions can have big impacts and NCC has launched its second annual cross-country Small Acts of Conservation challenge. It consists of a checklist of small-scale, individual actions that will benefit people and communities along with wildlife and their habitats.

Published on Wed, 06/13/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Volunteers use technology to help form a clearer picture of conservation

Volunteers use technology to help form a clearer picture of conservation

Technology and nature aren’t as separate as they seem. Here at the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC), we’ve been integrating the use of technology increasingly into our field work and Conservation Volunteers (CV) events.

“This type of information is crucial to identifying areas in Canada that need protection, monitoring our existing lands and assessing what conservation actions are needed.” - Dan Kraus, NCC's national conservation biologist

In all 10 of our provinces, NCC is working to protect important natural areas and the species they sustain.

Published on Thu, 05/17/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Turtles: Canada's culture in a shell

Turtles: Canada's culture in a shell

By Raechel Bonomo, Staff Writer at the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC)

On May 23, World Turtle Day, the Nature Conservancy of Canada celebrates these slow but steady creatures.

It was a gloomy day in southern Ontario. Although the canoe I paddled in was quiet, the landscape was anything but, filled with croaks and chirping. Ten feet away emerged a small creature from the glass-like water to stretch its tiny head from under a strong shell. Swimming through shadowy water, the darkness of the lake only made its yellow neck more prevalent. As we carefully paddled closer to our new friend, he greeted us with a distinguishable smile. It was a Blanding’s turtle.

Published on Sat, 04/07/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Volunteer ideas for nature lovers

Volunteer ideas for nature lovers

National Volunteer Week, April 15 to 21, 2018, is the perfect time to lend a hand in your community.

National Volunteer Week, April 15 to 21, is the perfect time to lend a hand in your community. With spring finally here, why not take advantage of the more comfortable temperatures and volunteer outdoors? There are many nature conservation volunteer opportunities where you can get some fresh air, meet others with similar interests and explore new areas, all while protecting nature and wildlife.

Published on Mon, 01/29/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Tips on how to squeeze in time for nature

Tips on how to squeeze in time for nature

By Gayle Roodman, Editorial Services Manager at the Nature Conservancy of Canada

We all lead busy lives, full of work and family commitments, errands and to-do lists that, over the course of a day, seem to magically grow longer.

Published on Fri, 01/26/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

This Groundhog Day, it’s all relatives

This Groundhog Day, it’s all relatives

February 2 marks Groundhog Day, a North American tradition dating back to 1888. The groundhog, also called the woodchuck, is the largest member of the squirrel family and one of four marmot species that live in Canada. Rather than just focusing on groundhogs this year, here are some fascinating facts about these rodents and some of their close relatives:

Published on Tue, 01/16/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Make a pledge to nature this year

Make a pledge to nature this year

If you didn't make any New Year’s resolutions, if you’ve given up on the ones you made or if you want to add more to your list, make it a goal this year to devote yourself to nature. Getting out into nature is great for your health, learning about nature expands your knowledge and helping conserve natural areas and the species that live in them is vital to our planet’s health. Here are some ideas on how you can appreciate and give back to nature in 2018:

Published on Sat, 12/23/2017 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

10 ways to start 2018 on a green foot

10 ways to start 2018 on a green foot

With 2017 come and gone, there’s no better time than now to turn over a new leaf. The beginning of a new year brings new possibilities, and we make resolutions that we hope will stick over the next 365 days. Whether you’re hoping to hit the gym more frequently this year, or pledging to devote more time to family and friends, try incorporating nature into your resolutions. By putting more green into your step in 2018, you are not only benefiting the planet, but boosting your own well-being.

Published on Thu, 12/21/2017 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Celebrating another year of conservation successes, coast to coast

Celebrating another year of conservation successes, coast to coast

This year, the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) has a lot to celebrate. Coast to coast, we have conserved more than 20,000 acres (8,208 hectares) of land from the beginning of the year to November 2017 alone, adding to the 2.8 million acres (more than 1.1 million hectares) conserved since 1962. Through Conservation Volunteer events, speaker series’ and fundraising campaigns — and with the help of our partners and Canadians across the country — NCC has marked another great year for conservation.

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