Environment and Nature

Published on Fri, 11/16/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Three ways to get closer to nature

Three ways to get closer to nature

Canadians are more disconnected from nature than ever before. We spend more and more of our time indoors, and a large per cent of us live in an urban setting away from large natural areas.

We’re losing touch with the natural world, one that needs our help to stop and reverse the damage left by development and climate change.

Published on Tue, 10/23/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Demystifying spooky species this Halloween

Demystifying spooky species this Halloween

By Wendy Ho, Content Coordinator, Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC)

Why do some species spook us more than others? Some say it is an evolutionary adaptation, some say it is an irrational fear, while still others say that is because some (like spiders) are always shrouded in myths.

If you’re not a fan of spiders, read on below to learn more about a few common spooky species, and turn your perception of them from awful to awesome.

Published on Mon, 10/15/2018 by Scouts Canada

Find Inspiration in Nature with 5 Beautiful Fall Hikes Recommended by Scouts Canada, the Outdoor Experts

Find Inspiration in Nature with 5 Beautiful Fall Hikes Recommended by Scouts Canada, the Outdoor Experts

The young outdoor experts at Scouts Canada are always going on adventures in search of perfect spots to set up camp, observe wildlife, and take in stunning views. One of the most beautiful seasons to experience the great outdoors is in the fall when the temperatures are moderately cool, and the leaves begin to change into bright amber hues.

Published on Fri, 10/12/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Twelve fascinating facts about Canadian snakes

Twelve fascinating facts about Canadian snakes

 

World Reptile Day is on October 21, 2018

In honour of World Reptile Day, here are some interesting tidbits about Canada's native snake species:

Published on Wed, 10/03/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

10 fascinating facts about wild turkeys

10 fascinating facts about wild turkeys

Today marks Thanksgiving in Canada. The first official, annual Canadian Thanksgiving took place on November 6, 1879. In honour of Thanksgiving, here are 10 facts about wild turkeys to gobble up; a species that has been documented on Nature Conservancy of Canada properties in Ontario and Quebec:

1. Male wild turkeys are called “toms,” while females are called “hens.”

Published on Thu, 09/13/2018 by RecycleSmart

RecycleSmart Ranks 12th on the 2018 Growth 500

RecycleSmart Ranks 12th on the 2018 Growth 500

“This award recognizes the hard work and dedication from our team to provide exceptional service. Our drive to innovate is a constant corporate value with several new technology innovations being rolled out in 2019 to our customers across Canada.”

Canada’s industry-leading smart waste and recycling services provider recognized for rapid growth

RICHMOND, British Columbia /COMMUNITYWIRE/ - Canadian Business and Maclean’s today ranked RecycleSmart 12th on the 30th annual Growth 500 list, the definitive ranking of Canada’s Fastest-Growing Companies. Produced by Canada’s premier business and current affairs media brands, the Growth 500 ranks Canadian businesses on five-year revenue growth.
Published on Fri, 08/03/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Nature Conservancy of Canada asks Canadians to help stop the spread of invasive species through summer recreational activities

Nature Conservancy of Canada asks Canadians to help stop the spread of invasive species through summer recreational activities

The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) hopes people are enjoying the outdoors and connecting with nature this summer, but at the same time is encouraging them to help control the spread of invasive species. 

Many invasive species have few natural predators to control them. Once they get into ecosystems, they’re often able to spread and out-compete our native plants and animals for space, water, food and other resources.

The not-for-profit, private land conservation group is highlighting 10 invasive species that can be spread as a result of people going about their summer outdoor recreation. Activities such as camping, hiking, biking, fishing, boating, horseback riding and driving ATVs can unintentionally spread invasive species into our rivers, streams and forests. 

Published on Mon, 06/25/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Look out for and report Giant hogweed: Nature Conservancy of Canada raises awareness about dangerous plant

Look out for and report Giant hogweed: Nature Conservancy of Canada raises awareness about dangerous plant

While summer is arriving, another sign of better weather brings a troublesome and dangerous plant called giant hogweed.

Giant hogweed is one of Canada’s most dangerous plants as it poses a real human health concern.

The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is urging people across the country to document sightings of the towering green plant. Giant hogweed is one of Canada’s most dangerous plants as it poses a real human health concern.

Published on Thu, 06/21/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Nature Conservancy of Canada offers national challenge for Canadians

Nature Conservancy of Canada offers national challenge for Canadians

As summer approaches and people look for things to do over the coming weeks, the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is offering fun ideas that help out nature.

Our individual actions can have big impacts and NCC has launched its second annual cross-country Small Acts of Conservation challenge. It consists of a checklist of small-scale, individual actions that will benefit people and communities along with wildlife and their habitats.

Published on Wed, 06/13/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Volunteers use technology to help form a clearer picture of conservation

Volunteers use technology to help form a clearer picture of conservation

Technology and nature aren’t as separate as they seem. Here at the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC), we’ve been integrating the use of technology increasingly into our field work and Conservation Volunteers (CV) events.

“This type of information is crucial to identifying areas in Canada that need protection, monitoring our existing lands and assessing what conservation actions are needed.” - Dan Kraus, NCC's national conservation biologist

In all 10 of our provinces, NCC is working to protect important natural areas and the species they sustain.

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