Environment and Nature

Published on Thu, 06/15/2017 by BASF Canada

Drydown application ‘very important’ for straight-cutting canola

Drydown application ‘very important’ for straight-cutting canola

The trend of straight-cutting in canola has gained traction in recent years, particularly with farmers managing an increasing number of farm acres. A 2015 study from Ipsos found 74 percent of growers surveyed are interested in trying straight-cutting canola on their farm. Agronomists estimate that half of all canola acres will be harvested using straight-cutting by 2020.  

Those who do it, cite benefits of better management of acres, larger seeds, less green seed, reduced dockage compared to swathing, and improved weed control.

Published on Wed, 06/07/2017 by BASF Canada

Proper machinery and a pre-harvest drydown can maximize straight cutting success

Proper machinery and a pre-harvest drydown can maximize straight cutting success

With unpredictable autumn weather, harvest timing is often a balancing act. This was clear in 2016, when early snow arrived in October and interrupted harvest. Many growers found themselves with some of the 2016 crop still out in the field and little or no fall field work done.

Incorporating straight cutting some acres can help balance harvest timing, reducing some of the risks and helping growers get their crops in the bin.

Published on Mon, 06/05/2017 by BASF Canada

Bullish market for canola puts focus on disease management

Bullish market for canola puts focus on disease management

The 2017 season is poised to be a big year for canola growers. Economists predict canola earnings to range from $11.45 to $12.15/bu, and Agri-Food and Agriculture Canada released its first seeded acre estimates for 2017, with canola up 3.1 percent to 21M acres – a five-year high. Many regions throughout Saskatchewan are estimating upwards of 40 percent of the acres will have canola on them, which begs the question: how many of these acres will be a canola-snow-canola rotation?

Last year was a perfect storm for sclerotinia infection in the prairies.

Published on Wed, 05/31/2017 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Canadian Environment Week: Volunteers make a huge impact

Canadian Environment Week: Volunteers make a huge impact

By Kailey Setter, Nature Conservancy of Canada

Each spring and early summer, as Canada’s migratory species start arriving at their breeding and nesting grounds, the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC’s) Conservation Volunteers also emerge from their wintering grounds.

Published on Wed, 05/31/2017 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Maintain forests and plant trees to breathe with ease

Maintain forests and plant trees to breathe with ease

June 7 is Clean Air Day. Part of Canadian Environment Week, this special day aims to drive awareness about air quality.

The negative impacts of air pollution on our health are now well-known. In fact, tens of thousands of Canadians suffer from respiratory problems related to and worsened by air pollution.

Published on Tue, 05/16/2017 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

10 fun facts about turtles

10 fun facts about turtles

World Turtle Day, May 23, is an annual occasion that the American Tortoise Rescue began 17 years ago to honour and promote turtle and tortoise conservation around the world. Sadly, global turtle and tortoise populations are declining because of smuggling, climate change, habitat destruction, the exotic food industry and the pet trade.

Published on Tue, 05/16/2017 by BASF Canada

Use multiple modes of action to protect pulses from white mould and address weed resistance

Use multiple modes of action to protect pulses from white mould and address weed resistance

Use multiple modes of action to protect pulses from white mould and address weed resistance

Pulse acres are growing rapidly in Western Canada, and with tighter rotations comes a need for growers to protect their crops from such diseases as white mould.

Published on Tue, 05/16/2017 by BASF Canada

Rotate crop inputs for resistance management and higher profit potential Canola is an economic driver in Western Canada. It con

Rotate crop inputs for resistance management and higher profit potential Canola is an economic driver in Western Canada. It con

Rotate crop inputs for resistance management and higher profit potential

Canola is an economic driver in Western Canada. It contributes $26.7 billion to the Canadian economy each year, and growing crush capacities are providing new opportunities and growth for canola growers.

With growing demand, canola acreage is increasing and crop rotations are getting tighter. These tighter rotations can lead to increased weed pressures and herbicide resistance – all while impacting your bottom line.

Published on Fri, 12/16/2016 by BASF Canada

Making advancements on your farm operation by harvesting more than just your crops this season

Making advancements on your farm operation by harvesting more than just your crops this season

Grow the crop, harvest the crop, haul it to the elevator. If only farming were that simple.

The fact is, crop producers have more variables than ever to manage. Today’s growers not only need to manage the data from inputs and yields in each of their fields, but they also need to manage grain contracts and on-farm storage.

This matters because at harvest time growers are vividly reminded that the success of their year’s sweat and toil can often be determined by how much grain goes in and out of the bins and at what price is it sold.

Published on Wed, 12/14/2016 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Five Eco-Friendly Holiday Gift Ideas

Five Eco-Friendly Holiday Gift Ideas

Running out of gift ideas this holiday season? Fear not! Check out these suggestions for the nature lovers and environmentalists in your life:

1.   Ecosystem Globe

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