Environment and Nature

Published on Thu, 06/20/2019 by Scouts Canada

Be “Head Safe” this summer with helpful tips to protect against head injury from outdoor experts Scouts Canada and Hydro One

Be “Head Safe” this summer with helpful tips to protect against head injury from outdoor experts Scouts Canada and Hydro One

Recognizing the signs of head injuries and taking precautions to prevent them is essential to enjoying outdoor adventures. That’s why Scouts Canada and Hydro One have teamed up to inspire others to work safe, live safe and play safe.

Summer is finally here, marking the end of school for millions of young people in Canada and the peak season for camping, cycling, paddling, rock climbing and many other sports and adventurous activities. While these activities are fun, it is important to prevent the possibility of injury for kids and adults alike, by keeping head safety tips top of mind.

Published on Mon, 06/10/2019 by Scouts Canada

A Scout’s Guide to the Ultimate Summer Camping Trip

A Scout’s Guide to the Ultimate Summer Camping Trip

High-resolution photos can be downloaded here.

27ºC. That’s the perfect temperature for summer camping according to Scouts – Canada’s youngest outdoor experts. So, go check the thermometer. It’s time to answer the call of the wilderness!

Published on Wed, 03/20/2019 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

World Water Day: Why a burning river should give you hope

World Water Day: Why a burning river should give you hope

By Dan Kraus
World Water Day is on Friday, March 22, 2019

There’s a picture of water I think about a lot. It’s not a loon on a misty lake. It’s not the classic Canadian image showing the back of a favourite paddling mate in the bow of a canoe. It’s a picture of a burning river.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the last fire on the Cuyahoga River in Ohio. In June 1969, a slick of oil and debris floating on the river ignited. This was not the first time that flame and river had met on the Cuyahoga. By 1969, there had been just over a century of river fires on these waters.

Published on Wed, 02/13/2019 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Conservation is a labour of love

Conservation is a labour of love

By Christine Beevis-Trickett

Valentine’s Day has become a time to celebrate the ones we love. But this year, I’m also thinking about those whose passion for natural areas has led to their long-time conservation of the places that Canadians love and enjoy. I was reminded recently of the importance of passion for nature when it comes to conservation while reading the late Dr.

Published on Fri, 02/01/2019 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Wetlands play a critical role for people and nature

Wetlands play a critical role for people and nature

By Dan Kraus

February 2 is World Wetlands Day

I live next to a swamp. After 20 years of having this swamp as my neighbour, it’s kind of grown on me. I enjoy the spring flush of marsh marigolds, the annual reawakening of spring peepers, and I still smile when I see a colourful wood duck perched in a tree.

My swamp has two sources that keep it wet: water that seeps from the ground, and runoff from snowmelt and heavy summer rains. All wetlands are wetlands because they are permanently or seasonally wet.

Published on Fri, 01/25/2019 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Five facts about grizzly bears that will surprise you

Five facts about grizzly bears that will surprise you

Perhaps no other animal symbolizes the stunning beauty of the Canadian wilderness as much as the grizzly bear.

Perhaps no other animal symbolizes the stunning beauty of the Canadian wilderness as much as the grizzly bear. A type of brown bear, grizzly bears occur in the wilderness of western and northern Canada. The species' scientific name, Ursus horribilis, means “terrifying bear.” However, although they won’t shy away from protecting their food or their young, grizzly bears are typically peaceful creatures.

Published on Mon, 01/21/2019 by Scouts Canada

Take Winter Adventures to the Next Level with Scouts Canada’s Ultimate Camping Hacks

Take Winter Adventures to the Next Level with Scouts Canada’s Ultimate Camping Hacks

Winter and camping, an oxymoron? Or the ultimate outdoor adventure? The experts at Scouts Canada agree with the latter!

Picture this, you’ve just set up camp and have a warm fire roaring, when white billows of snow begin to fall around you. There’s nothing more Canadian than winter camping, but of course, warmth, comfort, and safety should be top of mind before planning your next (or first) camping venture in cold temperatures.

Published on Fri, 01/11/2019 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Open for business: Making an insect hotel

Open for business: Making an insect hotel

Make your backyard or green space open for vacancy by making an insect hotel!

As temperatures reach below the freezing mark, wildlife seek shelter from the snow and winter. As someone who tends to wait out winter indoors, under a blanket fort with a warm coffee and book in hand, only occasionally bundling up to brave the cold for some time in nature, I can relate to the need to seek dry and warm places from November to March.

Published on Wed, 12/26/2018 by Nature Conservancy of Canada

Three lessons about nature from your old Christmas tree

Three lessons about nature from your old Christmas tree

By Dan Kraus, Senior Conservation Biologist

People living in the northern hemisphere have brought trees and boughs into their homes during the winter for thousands of years. The evergreens that we decorate with during Christmas can represent a celebration of holidays and a reminder that spring will come again.

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